Updated results from a trial with belzutifan for people with advanced kidney cancer

Kidney cancers frequently have mutations in the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) gene, resulting in high levels of a protein called hypoxia-inducible factor, or HIF-2α. This results in a number of changes in the cancer cells and their surrounding environment that favour tumour growth. The novel hypoxia-inducible factor 2α (HIF-2α) inhibitor, belzutifan (MK-6482), blocks the action of HIF-2α. In a small […]

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Treatment of kidney masses in patients with VHL disease

In this video interview, Dr Eric Jonasch from MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas describes how to treat a kidney mass in patients with VHL disease. VHL (von Hippel-Lindau) disease is very rare and affects about 1 in 35,000 people. Between 30 to 70% of people with VHL disease have kidney masses. If the mass […]

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HIF2α inhibitor provides significant clinical benefit in patients with VHL kidney cancer

One of the major breakthroughs this year the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-2α inhibitor: MK6482 for von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease–related clear cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC). VHL disease is a hereditary disease that affects many organs of the body, such as the eyes, brain, spine, pancreas, kidneys and lymphatic system. It is caused by a mutation in […]

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Future for VHL kidney cancer is bright

Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease–associated renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has always been difficult to treat. However, a group of researchers led by Dr William G. Kaelin Jr from the Dana-Faber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School in America have discovered treatments including immunotherapy, HIF-2α inhibitors, and potentially CDK4/6 inhibitors for the treatment of VHL-associated RCC. He […]

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ASCO 2020: HIF-2 alpha inhibitor induced positive response for VHL-associated kidney cancer

Results from a phase II international trial led by researchers at MD Anderson Cancer Center in America were presented during the 2020 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Virtual Scientific Program. The trial showed treatment with a novel hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-2 alpha inhibitor (MK-6482) was well tolerated and resulted in clinical responses in patients with von […]

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VHL disease and HIF-2alpha inhibitor

In this video interview, Dr Eric Jonasch from MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, Texas, USA speaks about the use of  hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) 2alpha inhibitor for the treatment of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) associated with von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease. Firstly, Dr Jonasch describes how HIF-2alpha combines with HIF-1beta to act as a transcription factor […]

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Hereditary kidney cancer – new syndromes

A recent review of the literature in European Urology summarises the preclinical and clinical data on hereditary renal cancer. There are several well-described hereditary renal cancer syndromes, such as von Hippel-Lindau disease (VHL), a hereditary syndrome that may lead to the development of renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Patients with VHL have a lifetime risk of […]

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Potential new treatment strategy for kidney cancer

A research study, published online in eLife, has provided new insight into the mechanisms behind the development of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC), which could have implications for how ccRCC is treated. The researchers have discovered that changes or mutations in tumour suppressor genes (VHL, PBRM1, KDM5C, SETD2 and BAP1) responsible for slowing down […]

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ESMO 2018: Interviews with the kidney cancer experts

The following video interviews with kidney cancer experts from the USA and Europe were conducted at the recent European Society of Medical Oncology (ESMO) 2018 congress in Munich last month. The interviews cover topics such as a new treatment for VHL-associated kidney cancer, real world effectiveness of pazopanib for renal cell carcinoma (RCC), recommendations for […]

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Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease and the risk for kidney cancer

Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease is caused by a change (mutation) in a tumour suppressor gene, called the VHL gene. When the VHL gene is mutated, this can lead to uncontrolled cell growth and the development of cancer. Lack of VHL protein caused by the mutation can also increase the growth of new blood vessels (angiogenesis), causing the […]

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